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WETA
Mar 14, 2011 6:30pm EDT
nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
WETA
Mar 9, 2011 6:30pm EST
holding in u.s. treasuries. >> tom: we ask pimco's bill gross why he's bailing out of government debt and where he's putting money now. you're watching "nightly business" report for wednesday, march 9. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possibley: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds, corporate debt, foreign bonds and municipal securities. >> susie: so what's the reason behind the bond fire sale? joining us now: william gross, the founder and co-chief investment officer of pimco. hi, b
WETA
Mar 17, 2011 6:30pm EDT
. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besi
WETA
Mar 28, 2011 6:30pm EDT
>> tom: more than a week after air strikes began, what's the taxpayers' bill so far for u.s. military operations in libya? >> we've spent between $300 and $500 million, but as we move forward those costs should drop substantially. >> suzanne: as president obama talks to americans about libya, we'll look at how much money the conflict will cost the u.s., even as nato takes the lead. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 28. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. u.s. warplanes, ships and missiles have been striking against libya for more than a week. this evening, suzanne, president obama makes his case to the american people. that's after facing questions about the goals and costs of the mission. >> suzanne: and, tom, the president's speech come
WETA
Mar 23, 2011 7:00pm EDT
. >> lehrer: and former senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the
WETA
Mar 1, 2011 6:30pm EST
temporary and relatively modest increase in u.s. consumer price inflation. >> susie: the latest on inflation and what it'll take to end the fed's government bond buying binge. you're watching "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 1. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. ben bernanke said today the federal reserve is ready to take action if high oil prices threaten the economy. susie, the fed chief's comments came on a day when oil prices gushed higher. >> susie: tom, as bernanke was testifying on capitol hill in washington, oil futures trading here in new york surged to just below the $100 level. april crude rose $2.66 a barrel, or more than 2.5%. and those rising oil prices triggered a stock sell-off on wall street-- the dow fell 168 points, the nasdaq lost 44, and the s&p 500 off almost 22. >> tom: against that market back
WETA
Mar 3, 2011 7:00pm EST
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but prid
WETA
Mar 24, 2011 7:00pm EDT
the "newshour" tonight: we update the military operation and get two views on what the u.s. and its allies can do to stop moammar qaddafi's forces. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to the editor of the yemen times about the growing protests in that arab nation. >> they want a life where they don't have to think of future and be equal. >> brown: paul solman has the story of the widening gap in american society between the very rich and the rest of the country. >> the top 1% is living well, and they don't get it. they don't get what is happening to this country and i feel like we're creating a third world country subculture within this country. >> lehrer: and ray suarez looks at new census numbers showing one in six americans is hispanic. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny
WETA
Mar 28, 2011 6:00pm EDT
call the u.s. home. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. in libya, state television is reporting you allied air strikes tonight, even as anti-government rebels) on what could be an important symbolic victory after a weekend of military gains. there have been moving steadily west, retaking towns they had earlier lost, moving from benghazi, the rebels are now in control of three other towns. the biggest victory could be the capture of sirte, colonel gaddafi's home town. >> taking the fight to colonel gaddafi's birthplace. rebels pounding targets near the town of sirte. a victory here would have huge the symbolic value. if the libyan leader cannot defend his home town, how long can he defend his regime? rebels said these were some of his supporters, mercenaries, they claimed, sent to kill, but defeated by poorly armed volunteers. we found rebel fighters racing to the front lines with a clear message for the libyan leader. a few weeks ago, a gesture like this would have gotten him killed. along the way, we met this band of brothers and cousins, and extended fa
WETA
Mar 18, 2011 8:00pm EDT
important to this administration that this not be seen as a u.s. operation. so there really was a need from their point of view to build up enough international political support so that the united states could say -- stay if not in the background, at least sort of on the sidelines. >> and the president in his press conference, i thought it was striking to list the things that we're not going to do. we're not going to deploy ground troops. we're not going to use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. what's with all this not, not, not stuff? >> there's a lot of ambiguity. he did say we're not going to employ a ground force which is prohibited by the u.n. resolution as well. he also said the goal of the operation will not go beyond protecting civilians. but at the same time, he said qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. and you had secretary clinton and you had the french government also saying that the logical result of this operation will be that the qaddafi regime is overthrown. so they've certainly injected -- gwen: a logical result, but is that the goal? they've now set ou
WETA
Mar 30, 2011 12:00pm EDT
monday, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
WETA
Mar 29, 2011 7:00pm EDT
johnny isakson, about u.s. involvement in the north african country. >> ifill: then, marcia coyle walks us through today's supreme court arguments in a huge class action suit against wal-mart. >> woodruff: we update the nuclear crisis in japan, as the prime minister says his country is on "maximum alert." >> ifill: miles o'brien reports from the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, the chernobyl power plant, where, decades later, radiation levels are still higher than normal. >> 25 years after the accident here, scientists are still trying to piece together its full impact. in the wake of events in japan there's new focus on their work. >> woodruff: and ray suarez interviews housing analyst robert shiller about new evidence of falling home prices in cities across the nation. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> .and our communities.
WETA
Mar 31, 2011 6:30pm EDT
buying? i a word, corn. the u.s. ag department reported lower corn supplies. that helped corn prices jump more than 4%, and higher corn prices helped the farm stocks. speaking of hot commodities, oil is back at two and a half year highs. light sweet crude closing over $106 a barrel. brent sea crude oil ending its session at over $117 a barrel, the highest prices since the fall of 2008. now, from oil to cars: used auto seller carmax earnings came in as expected, but used car sales were light. and even though same-store sales say a double-digit pop, it was not as much as analysts had forecast. that sent shares down, falling more than 7%. volume was four times normal. this is the past 180 sessions, and the stock is back to where it began in the year. electric car maker tesla really saw a spark today, jumping almost 17% on very heavy volume. tesla went public in june, trading in the low 20s. morgan stanley called it america's fourth auto maker, upgrading shares to overweight. its price target-- $70 per share, two and a half times over tonight's closing price. auto parts maker meritor she
WETA
Mar 2, 2011 6:30pm EST
vehicle sales rose 29% compared to a year ago. u.s. brands made up 40% of sales. g.m. models were especially popular. joining us now: autonation's president, michael maroone. hi, mike, nice to have you on the program. >> hi, thanks for having me tonight. >> susie: so you've had two months of back to back strong sales, but as you heard on our report a lot of concerns about higher oil prices, higher gasoline prices getting close to $4 a gallon. could that break the momentum? >> susie, at this point it's not a factor in the purchase decision. we're seeing consumers have really normal spending pat earns, certainly fuel efficiency is a consideration, but it's not the driving factor. now as fuel prices move up or when fuel prices move up, it could be a factor. we call it the freak out point, and that's somewhere north of $4 a gallon. >> susie: so that's when consumers just say that's going to be just too much for me to fill a tank and they back off from coming into the showroom? >> no, i think it's actually where they move to different products. and we saw it back in 2008 where there wa
WETA
Mar 17, 2011 1:00am EDT
there's much concern in the u.s. that a similar accident can occur here. how do you respond to that concern? >> well, first, i would agree with you. the reactor in chernobyl was of a different design. it was-- it had point of instability. it had no containment vessel. but we are looking very carefully at what is naepg japan because, as you say, they're using more advanced designs. a number of reactors in the united states have similar designs, and we're going to look at what went wrong in terms of the double-barreled whammy this huge, hung earthquake and huge su, and look to our reactors again and learn as much as we can so we can, if needed, improve the safety. by "if needed" what i really mean is we're always increasing the safety of our reactors, and not only our reactors but the safety of all our industrial systems. >> mr. secretary, two days ago a number of us wrote to chairman upton, whitfield, and stearns, asking our committee here investigate and hold hearings about the safety and prepared understandness of the nuclear power plant in the united states. do you think we should
WETA
Mar 29, 2011 1:00am EDT
technologically power in 20 years. they are still behind the u.s. they have to put up a stealth fighter, put a man into space, that's a prodigious effort on their part. >> rose: is the faceoff between china and the united states going to come primarily in the pacific. is that where the struggle will be? >> i don't think there will be a faceoff in a sense of a a conflict. >> rose: i don't mean a military conflict. but i mean a struggle for... >> a strul for influence, yes. i think it will be subdued because the chinese need the u.s. chinese need u.s. markets, need u.s. technology and needs to have students go to the u.s. and study u.s. ways and then start doing business so that they can improve and it's going to take them ten, 20, 30 years. all that information and all that technological capabilities will be cut off from them. so it will be maintained at a level which allows them to still top the u.s. >> rose: you knew deng xiaoping well. what would he be doing today? would he be any different than hu jintao? >> i cannot say because deng xiaoping was of a different generation and
WETA
Mar 23, 2011 6:30pm EDT
for joining us. new signs today the u.s. housing market still is struggling. susie, that's even as many parts of the economy are recovering. >> susie: tom, what got everyone concerned is the latest new home sales numbers. they fell to a record low. sales tumbled almost 17% in february. even lower prices couldn't bring in the buyers. the average selling price for a new home fell to $202,000. at the current sales pace, it would take almost nine months to sell all the new homes on the market. >> tom: this discouraging news comes right at the start of the spring selling season. erika miller reports. >> reporter: instead of eating during her lunch hour, angie moncada likes to go house hunting online. she and her husband have been waiting for spring to get serious about their search. >> we want to move somewhere around the beginning of june. also it seems like things are just picking up generally, and we're hoping that people who have been holding out on putting their homes on the market will be doing so now. >> reporter: it also doesn't hurt that home prices nationwide are still falling
WETA
Mar 4, 2011 6:30pm EST
the first time in almost two years. >> tom: can the hiring continue? the outlook for the u.s. job market from two top economists. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, march 4. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. finally we got some good news today about the job market: strong business hiring in february. but tom, that was overshadowed by a big jump in oil prices. >> tom: susie, oil prices surged again today as anti-government protests continued in libya, bahrain and yemen. april crude futures now stand at $104 a barrel up $2.50 to more than a two-year high. but on the bright side, american businesses added 192,000 jobs in february-- the fastest pace of hiring since last may. the unemployment rate dropped to 8.9%-- the third straight monthly decline. >> susie: from wall street to main street, everyone's trying to figure out if
WETA
Mar 8, 2011 6:30pm EST
wall street. here's how u.s. attorney preet bharara put it when charges were announced at the end of 2009. >> it would be a mistake to think that this investigation is focused only, or even principally on, hedge funds. we have gone far beyond that. in fact, this investigation goes to the very heart of fair play in the business world. >> susie: joining us now with more analysis, steven feldman. he's a former u.s. attorney who worked in new york's securities fraud task force, and is now a white collar defense attorney at herrick, feinstein. >> hi, steven, nice to have you here with us. >> thank you, susan. >> susie: how strong is the government's case against raj rajaratnam? >> susie, that's what we're going to find out. the government, up until now, does all of the talking. they have the indictment. in that indictment, they put forward their best foot, and all their evidence. that evidence seems to be strong. it includes hours and hours of wiretap evidence, that includes the testimony of confidential performants. the defense has not had a chance to do anything yet. that's why we have
WETA
Mar 4, 2011 7:00pm EST
thumb, every 10 dollars on oil prices reduces growth in the u.s. by about two/10 to 3/10 of a percent so right now 10, 15 dollars in the last couple of months we're looking at growth maybe instead of 3.2 or 3.3, only 3%. but if it goes to 150, say, that's a whole different story or even higher. then i think we have reason to worry. >> so summing up, is it too soon to call it a turning point. how would you characterize it. >> i would say certainly the job situation is a turning point. i think we have seen this recovery now spread to the jobs market. there is this sort of cloud, thunder cloud on the horizon but if all goes well, and in fact some of the turmoil in the middle east sort of settles down, oil prices will come down and that particular source of risk, if you will, to the u.s. economy will dissipate. >> and lisa lynch what do you see, how would you characterize it and how many, if you get about 200,000 jobs this month, how many do we need and how long do we need to sustain it before you say okay, now it's real. >> so 200,000 jobs a month, if we continue to keep that pace of job
WETA
Mar 31, 2011 1:00am EDT
focus on u.s. energy independence. >> susie: tom, the president says it's time to "get serious about a long-term policy for secure affordable energy." >> tom: the president issued his blueprint for a secure energy future. it calls for cutting the nation's oil imports by one third by 2025. >> we're going to have to find ways to boost our efficiency so we use less oil. we've got to discover and produce cleaner, renewable sources of energy that also produce less carbon pollution, which is threatening our climate. and we've got to do it quickly. >> tom: the response from the oil industry has been varied. conoco phillips said it was encouraged by the president's call for more domestic oil production, but that it wants to see more specifics. while the former president of shell oil, john hofmeister, says the president's energy plan sounded more like a campaign speech. >> i heard politics as usual, because if there was a seriousness about it, if there was an intent to move forward, i think there would be more than rhetoric. there would be specifics around what would happen this calendar year
WETA
Mar 3, 2011 12:30am EST
the longest war in u.s. history with former assistant secretary of defense and vietnam veteran bing west. in his book, he offers a speeding critique and says the u.s. military should not be in the business of nation-building. his new book is called "the wrong war." our conversation with bing west coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: as i mentioned at the top, the war in afghanistan is in its 10th year, making it the longest in u.s. history. among those who question u.s. currency and policy for years now is bing west. his new book on the subject is called
WETA
Mar 11, 2011 8:30pm EST
. >> ragtag forces in libya hang on. should the u.s. intervene? and national public radio shoots itself in the foot again. >> let me say at the outset we are putting this program together on friday as we are getting the details on the earthquake and tsunami in japan. we do not have a lot to add other than modern science and technology has allowed scientists on the west coast and in hawaii to warn residents that the tsunami was coming. as always, the u.s. navy is ready to respond to events in the pacific with the military relief. the program is called "inside wash.." let me begin in washington. it has been a long while since congressional hearings have brought up so much publicity, much of it negative. this one was about homegrown terrorism with emphasis on home run muslims. ever since he announced the hearings, peter king has been accused of being a latter-day joan mcnerney, but he refused to back down. >> to back them would be an abdication of what i believe should be the main responsibility of this committee, to protect america from a terrorist attack. >> when you assign their violent ac
WETA
Mar 25, 2011 8:30pm EDT
. authorization, is to protect the population. that is the minimalist position. but the u.s. -- i don't know if the administration has used the word "objective," but the president has said he has to go. our national interest is that he go, because, as evan said, if he doesn't, we will have problems at home, we will have lost. the problem is that obama has hitched himself to the u.n., this multilateralism, so that we are constrained to go for what the u.n. and international community wants, which is much, much less than what the u.s. wants and needs. >> what if gaddafi doesn't go? peggy noonan in "the wall street journal" writes that we know what we are against, gaddafi. who are we for? >> is one of thing to take the position that he had to go or he should go or must go, and to set out to kill him or d.v.m.. just as you can say -- or defeat him. just as you can say we have an axis of evil in three countries and you oppose those countries, but we did not go to war with korea because it is part of the axis of evil. or when reagan talks about the evil empire, clearly an empire, but yet we did --
WETA
Mar 12, 2011 1:00am EST
worked well. there are similar plans are made in the u.s. to arrange for evacuation routes in the event of earthquakes, of tsunamies and earthquakes. so i think our degree of preparedness and the japanese degree of preparedness are quite similar. we learned a lot from each other. after a big earthquake like this there will be effortses to look at what worked and what didn't work and fix the things that didn't work. >> rose: what surprises you about what you have seen so far? >> this was much bigger than we expected to see on that part of the what's called the japan trench, subduction zone. and one of the things we've been learning ever since 2004 was, before 2004 we thought we knew which piece of subduction zones could have these really big earthquakes. the sue nationalia earthquake and now this on one-- the sumatra earthquake and now this one what the earth often does is we learn to be pretty humble in the face of the complexities of the earth. the earth has the ability to surprise us. i think none of us expected that anything this big would happen there. we're now realizing that
WETA
Mar 9, 2011 12:00pm EST
indicd he's willing to act and the senate arms committee believed the u.s. had to show it was full my prepared to step in and showing the prepared to step in and senator kerry said said we failed to act in rwanda and the slowness to react in bosnia and under the first president bush encouraged the shia to do an uprising against saddam hussein and didn't come to their aid as well and there are all kinds of ghosts haunting the error and president obama is very cautious at his core that every time the united states has gone into intervene in the middle east there's been a long-term consequence to the perception of our position that's been negative. >> charlie: ann marie, tell me what the options are. >> the first best option is a negotiated solution that gets qaddafi and his family out of office and out of the country and that is actually still a possibility on the table. he made an offer, obviously it's hard to know who's saying what but the fact is we've been putting a lot of pressure on him both outside the country in terms of sanctions and in terms of diplomatic pressure and telli
WETA
Mar 30, 2011 11:30pm EDT
bazzi, and andrew tabler. >> i think the one message-- and it's not the u.s., it's anyone who could speak to the syrians-- is to say the threshold not to be crossed is the use of indiscriminate violence against peaceful protesters. that's the threshold. we can be very disappointed about the lack of reform and that's a judgment the syrian people are going to have to make but in terms of the use of force against peaceful protesters, that's when i speak about kinsy and that i think should be the message. >> i agree. >> simon: we conclude with a conversation charlie taped recently with linda wells, the editor in chief of "allure" magazine. >> to do the magazine in the last 20 years is better than if we picked any other time-- not that we could have-- if we pick any other time in the past 20 years. more has chked now in the past 20 years, in terms of products, attitudes, in terms of the visual name of our culture and in terms of the acceptance of beauty and in terms of all the controversy attached to it-- plastic surgery and doing too much and anorexia and aging. there are all these subj
WETA
Mar 4, 2011 8:00pm EST
qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead and he must leave. gwen: but what can the u.s. do to make it happen? sanctions, navy ships, no-fly zone, all being debated but the bloodshed continues. at home there's no blood but it's a standoff all the same. >> the best way to govern is quit spending more money than we take in. >> we need to cut spending. >> we also believe those cuts must be smart and targeted. gwen: congress gets a two-week reprieve to approve a budget but the underlying fight is far from over. and at the supreme court, a near-unanimous vote that flies in the face of public opinion. >> my first thought was eight justices don't have the common sense god gave a goat. gwen: testing the limits of free speech. covering the week, james kitfield of national journal, john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times," and joan biskupic of "usa today." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for "washington week" is
WETA
Mar 4, 2011 8:30pm EST
-old u.s. marine corps lance corporal matthew snyder died in iraq, non-combat related. in 2006 when friends and family were bearing him, members of the westboro baptist church of topeka, kansas, showed up to inform the world that the lambs " was that was god's punishment for this nation's tolerance for homosexual. they held up signs that said, thank god for dead soldiers. thank god for 9/11. corporal snyder's father sued the church for inflicting emotional distress, among other things. a baltimore jury awarded him $11 million, later reduced to five and an appeals court threw out the verdict and this week the supreme court ruled 8-1 has heard all as the speech was, it was another last protected by the first amendment. as "the wall street journal" put it the other day, even jurors are protected by the first amendment. did you agree, nina question of >> the occurred agreed. remember the word empathy? you have empathy for mr. snyder, but the court's job is not necessarily to have empathy but to say what the rules are that cover -- govern the country. they say the first amendment is not
WETA
Mar 22, 2011 6:00pm EDT
u.s. air force eagle jetfighter crashed in rebel territory. the alliance says it wasn't shot down but suffered mechanical failure. its two crewmen have been rescued. east of tripoli, the fight for control of the city goes on. rebel forces were enjoying a moment of celebration. then this. how quickly the moment turned to panic and retreat. >> the condition is so serious. since last night, they have no lights, electricity in the hospital. they're working with generators. yesterday it was disaster because more than 22 missiles. >> 1973 pact, no one to die. >> no one died last night. the libyan government insists they will swear many civilians have been killed and wounded by allied strikes t might well be true. we have asked them for evidence. so far, they have not provided it. bbc news, tripoli. >> the american admiral leading the international operation to enforce the no-fly zone has said gaddafi loyalists are still attacking civilians and coalitions are considering options to stop that. on a diplomatic level, it is no clearer who will assume overall command n washington now, andrew nor
WETA
Mar 22, 2011 12:00pm EDT
people. i also have stated that it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go go. and we've got a wide range of tools in our military efforts to support that policy. we were very rapid in initiating unilateral sanctions and then helping to mobilize international sanctions against the qaddafi regime. >> rose: joining me now from the eastern city of tobruk is richard engel, chief foreign correspondent for nbc news. >> it's a pleasure, charlie. >> rose: what's your sense of this war? what factors on the ground influence the way you see it? >> the rebels here obviously are very excited that they finally have international support, particularly american support they feel that they have suddenly been recognized by the greatest military in the world, the u.s. military, and that army and air strikes and naval strikes will carry them to tripoli. i'm not sure if that's what the intended message is from the united states but it's how it's been perceived here and the rebel strategy seems to be allow the air strikes to continue to decimate qaddafi's army and they can do this very slow march to trip
WETA
Mar 25, 2011 7:00pm EDT
theodore kattouf. he served as u.s. ambassador to he served as u.s. ambassador to syria from 2001 to 2003, part of a 31-year career in the foreign service, most of it in the middle east. and ammar abdulhamid is a liberal democracy activist whose anti-regime activities led to his exile from syria in 2005. he now lives in the u.s. and writes the blog "syria revolution digest." welcome to both of you. the reports are, ammar is that this started with the arrest of some teenagers in the town, some anti-regime graffiti. it has clearly group. how has it group, what is involved now. >> what you have to realize is the seeds of this revolution has been planted years ago. what you are talking about syria with the arrest of the children, we are talking about the immediate cause. but people got an idea that the times were suitable for a revolution, finally, when of course tunisia was made and managed to topple their regime and egyptians and we saw immediately how the spark really, or the wave of protests took ever o the region. a lot of said finally. our time is now, seems to be. and the people withou
WETA
Mar 18, 2011 8:30pm EDT
concern in the u.s. that a similar accident could occur here. >> i would not take anything like that at face value. >> that is democratic congressman henry waxman of california. he is reacting to a question of whether nuclear reactors are safe. he says he cannot answer that question, nobody can. everybody looks at this says there is -- every time you look at this there is more threat of nuclear contamination. american officials were questioning whether the japanese were entirely forthcoming, whether they had understated the seriousness of the situation. what is the potential for similar nuclear disaster in the united states? there is talk of a nuclear resurgence in this country. is this going to put an end to that, colby? >> japan was hit with a triple when he, at the earthquake, tsunami, and -- a triple whammy, the earthquake, tsunami, and at the nuclear disaster. we have to worry about what would happen with some of these plants on the fal -- fault lines, particularly in new york and san francisco. six or seven states in this country depend on a nuclear power. now, this is not goin
WETA
Mar 7, 2011 6:30pm EST
central bank's $600 billion bond buying program if he thinks it's threatening the u.s. economy. dallas federal reserve president richard fisher, a longtime critic of the program, said he's doubtful the purchases are doing much good. meanwhile, the fed says consumer borrowing increased in january. it was the fourth straight month of gains led by loans for automobiles and education. but consumers weren't using plastic. credit card debt fell by 6%. and the world's largest maker of luxury goods has a new crown jewel. french fashion firm l.v.m.h. will buy italian jeweler bulgari for $5 billion. still ahead, the economic impact of the n.f.l. "beyond the scoreboard" looks at how america's cities could be financially tackled if pro football is cancelled for the fall. >> susie: still no vote tonight on wisconsin's $137 million budget shortfall. the state's democratic lawmakers, who left for illinois nearly three weeks ago to prevent a vote on a controversial bill, asked today for a meeting with governor scott walker. they wanted it to take place in a location near the border of wisconsin and il
WETA
Mar 4, 2011 12:00pm EST
make the mistake that the u.s. made in iraq. he didn't dismantle the military completely. >> rose: he dismantled the leadership. >> and brought in a new cadre of officers. and then he did something else. gradually he built a parallel military called the islamic revolutionary guard corps, the i.r.g.c. and with every passing year he strengthened them to the dret remit of the military. so we now have two military, one that is significant. >> so tell me your picture of iran today. i mean khamenei is the supreme leader. >> khamenei is the supreme leader. i think his space of power is essentially the i.r.g.c., the revolutionary guards. >> rose: and they're more loyal to him than they are to ahmadinejad or anyone else? >> they are more loyal to themselves, i think, right now because... >> rose: they're the power center. >> they're the power center. they've become an economic juggernaut. >> rose: they own things. >> they own about half the country. literally about half of the economy. >> rose: so therefore, it is argued, that sanctions can have an impact because sanctions can deny them their
WETA
Mar 18, 2011 12:00pm EDT
yesterday, u.s. energy secretary steven chu said the administration still supports expanding nuclear plants. some advocates continue to argue that nuclear power is an important way of reducing carbon emissions, others say the risks are too high. joining me now are three authors who have written about nuclear power, jonathan schell, michael levi of the council on foreign relations and bill tucker who's written widely on the issue and has this book called "terrestrial energy: how nuclear power will lead the green revolution and end america's energy odyssey." so what should we say at this moment no matter how that plays itself out but understanding this is about nuclear power and a natural disaster. what do we say about the future of nuclear power? >> as an advocate of nuclear power i would say this is obviously going to be a setback. i don't think it's going to stop the development of nuclear power. japan is in a unique situation. but really it's going ahead so rapidly in the world now. there are 65 reactors under construction all around the world. china's got 20 all by themselves. the
WETA
Mar 5, 2011 1:00am EST
more nurturing. i mean, science education in the u.s. is not up to scratch. and -- >> what does that mean "not up to scratch?" >> it's just not generating enough educated individuals, either those that would actually go into science-- which is what we're mainly talking about here-- but also produce an educated population who can actually contribute to making decisions in democracy that are increasingly going to be based on science. i mean it's going to be no good if we have innovation if we find individuals are so uncomfortable with certain things-- we can talk about stem cell arguments, for example-- that's it's not used. and we need to be able to educate a whole population that they can recognize what science is, and when you're coming to a scientific decision rather than a point of view. that's a little bit of a distraction from what you were asking. >> rose: here's an interesting question, is china better at it than we are, because on the other hand they have a paranoia about the free flow of information. >> exactly right. i'll tell what you i think about it. china is very l
WETA
Mar 31, 2011 12:30am EDT
-sponsor of new legislation aimed tonight at defunding u.s. military action in libya. also tonight, actor jeffrey tambor is here. former larry sander star is out this spring with three different film projects, including "win-win" and upcoming feature "meeting spencer." we're glad you joined us congressman ron paul and actor jeffrey tambor, coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you -- >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports "tavis smiley." with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one nation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] >> for generations the united states of america has played a unique role as an anchor of global security and as an advocate for human freedom. mindful o
WETA
Mar 23, 2011 12:00pm EDT
company coming in building a gate on the u.s. side, check their luggage on the u.s. side, pay a toll to walk across. we're doing the same thing with the truck entry. truck weight right now is six to eight hours to cross the border coming north. toll crossing that would be built privately and would collect a toll would ease that traffic to probably 20 minutes and save a lot of work in terms of the environment and a lot of other things that will ease congestion. >> small one. we had, in 2008 when the crises hit us, we have ice rinks and we had to close some of them. now in a partnership we will run all five. more hours, more equipment, more programming and more young people being served. we don't have to run those ourselves. >> the city of houston, we so envy central park here and millennium park. we built that downtown so people say we missed our shot. 14 acres right in the middle of downtown built a park when i was mayor. about 60% done with private funds. and maintained with a conservancy that is two thirds private funds. if you challenge citizens they'll come forward. but i tell you w
WETA
Mar 24, 2011 1:00am EDT
pickering. they have experience in this part of the world and the u.s. state department. i'm glad to have them back on this show but never together. what brought you two together on this report. >> i think that the century foundation had an idea that somehow the two of us might be able to work with them and an international group. we had nine internationals and seven americans, and produce something that really could be useful as they looked ahead. it was a little early, as you know, because negotiations have only begun to catch on. so we caught it at the right time, i think, to be helpful. and it was certainly when i was asked and they said lakhdar is there, i said you count me in. >> charlie: why would you say that. >> nobody's had more experience on the ground and with people in the region on afghanistan in particular than lakhdar brahimi. and for any of us, it's always a privilege and an honor to be associated with him. he has ideas, he has judgment, he has sophistication. it's all there, charlie. you'll want to talk to him. >> charlie: we'll see. >> speaking arabic -- [laughter]
WETA
Mar 16, 2011 12:00pm EDT
considering this the sdf as well as the u.s. military police force are all getting together and for the number three reactor, they will try to pour water from the sky using helicopters. they consider this today, however the radiation level in the sky was quite high so they have given up this today, but for the number three and number four reactors, right next to his buildings there are refired plants to inject water using water hoses. and if possible, an hour before it was announce that they will try this out even tonight. so every effort is being made to cool the system right now. and one other thing that concerns us is number five and number six nreactor, what is happening here? the number fife reactor, unless for the water level, it seems that it may be going down a little bit according to the information that we have, however, it is not a dangerous situation, a risky situation. the government and also the tokyo electric company is monitoring the situation and so reactor number six, it still has power generating power to cool the reactor and therefore this power generator is bein
WETA
Mar 16, 2011 1:00am EDT
how to do this but i think, you have to take out u.s. troops first before we can do anything. regional stability is extremely important and you have to bring in the region and talk about how you move forward. but that means our troops have to get out. and the cost, in addition the human costs, you look at the dollars, the trailians trailia- trillions of dollars and as longs war going on that isn't going to happen. >> charlie: you want legislation to cut off funding -- >> cut off funding for future operations in a began stan. i want funding there to protect the troops. anything they need, they performed well. they should be reported so whatever it takes to protect and support the troops we need to fund as well as the contractors. but we need to send this funding in and we need to do that and use the funding whatever we appropriate to begin withdrawing and we need to do that quickly. not in 2011 but we need to begin a massive drop down. >> charlie: what do you think of general gates. >> he's been very bold and he's made some statements and tried to help move the direction of our military
WETA
Mar 24, 2011 6:30pm EDT
jose socrates to resign. >> susie: here in the u.s., the financial markets ignored those debt concerns. but erika miller looks at why american investors may want to pay attention to the crisis in portugal. >> reporter: for the past few weeks, investors have had plenty of distractions, ranging from political upheaval in egypt and libya to natural disasters and nuclear problems in japan to sharply higher oil prices. but today, the spotlight was on a problem many thought had gone away-- the european debt crisis. the fall of the portuguese government has pushed that country's borrowing rates to record levels, making it more difficult for portugal to get a handle on it's debt. economist brian levitt says the fear in financial markets is that portugal could need an expensive bailout. >> the big fear about the fall of the government in portugal is that they are not going to go through the austerity measures that they need, that the larger euro-economies want for them to go through in order to get additional credit facilities. >> reporter: another fear is contagion, reinforced by cred
WETA
Mar 15, 2011 6:30pm EDT
confidence, and stock markets around the world sold off. here in the u.s., the panic- selling swept through wall street, but the major averages rebounded by the close of trading. the dow tumbled 137 points, reversing a loss of nearly 300 points earlier in the session. the nasdaq fell 33, and the s&p was down 15. so what happens now? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the moment the opening bell rang on wall street, fear gripped the stock market. trader art cashin says the disaster in japan prompted many investors to dump their holdings at any price. >> when you can't sell what you want to sell, you sell whatever you can-- sometimes, your grandmother's necklace. you don't like to sell that, but if that's the only thing that gets you money, you have to do that. >> reporter: the dow's decline was serious, but the drop was far worse in japan. the nikkei lost more than 10%. most european markets also fell. the question for investors is what to do now? is the stock market overreacting to the crisis in japan, or does it pose a major threat to global growth? market strategist alec young say
WETA
Mar 11, 2011 6:30pm EST
markets. here in the u.s. despite the japan's stock index tumbled almost 180 points closing just minutes after the earthquake hit. >> tom: we spoke with our correspondent in tokyo. and began by asking lucy craft what's the initial assessment of damage to businesses and industry in japan. >> companies hit quite hard. sony, hond on, toyota, the major auto makers have a lot of factories up in northeastern japan. there's been a range of damage to these companies. so those factories will be kind of knocked out of operation for various amounts of time. fortunately, the northeastern area of japan is very sparsely populated. this is -- if you compare this to the kobe earthquake of 16 years ago, it accounts for a much smaller amount of gdp. >> reporter: what have you learned about the damage to the trainl systems and infrastructure? >> we haven't heard about the damage to the train system which is a major source of transportation here. when you talk about energy, though, it's a whole different ball of wax, and there's a lot of different questions hanging over one or two of japan's nuclear power p
WETA
Mar 16, 2011 6:30pm EDT
around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of the area were urged to evacuate. >> susie: and tom, those warnings spooked u.s. stock investors
WETA
Mar 21, 2011 6:30pm EDT
joining us. at&t wants to buy t-mobile in a $39 billion deal that could reshape the u.s. wireless industry. susie, if approved, it would leave just three major carriers in this country: at&t, verizon and the much smaller sprint nextel. >> susie: it is a dramatic change, tom. the proposed merger has been approved by the boards of both at&t and t-mobile parent deutche telekom. the deal still faces scrutiny from the department of justice and the federal communications commission. >> tom: critics say the merger could lead to higher prices. and as darren gersh reports, it may also change the way wireless companies do business. >> reporter: to really understand what's driving the future of telecom, you need to appreciate the difference between smartphones and what analysts like dan hayes call dumb pipes. >> the fear among the network service providers is that they are being relegated to being dumb pipes, where all they are doing is providing connectivity for voice calls and connectivity to the internet and all the value is being taken by companies like google or applications providers w
WETA
Mar 7, 2011 7:00pm EST
, and we assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep b
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